theparisreview:

“Lesson learned: in the court of public opinion, nothing carries more weight than a well-timed poem.”
Daniel Defoe’s guide on how to win friends and influence people.

theparisreview:

“Lesson learned: in the court of public opinion, nothing carries more weight than a well-timed poem.”

Daniel Defoe’s guide on how to win friends and influence people.

micdotcom:

It’s happening. The House voted today to sue President Obama 

he Republican-controlled House of Representatives on Wednesday evening voted to sue President Obama over Obamacare.
This is historic.

In a 225-201 vote along party lines, our leaders in Washington decided that House lawyers will draft legal documents to launch a lawsuit against the president for allegedly exceeding his constitutional powers. 
But will anything come of this?

micdotcom:

It’s happening. The House voted today to sue President Obama 

he Republican-controlled House of Representatives on Wednesday evening voted to sue President Obama over Obamacare.

This is historic.

In a 225-201 vote along party lines, our leaders in Washington decided that House lawyers will draft legal documents to launch a lawsuit against the president for allegedly exceeding his constitutional powers. 

But will anything come of this?

academicatheism:

Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction, Study Finds
Young children who are exposed to religion have a hard time differentiating between fact and fiction, according to a new study published in the July issue of Cognitive Science.
Researchers presented 5- and 6-year-old children from both public and parochial schools with three different types of stories — religious, fantastical and realistic –- in an effort to gauge how well they could identify narratives with impossible elements as fictional.
The study found that, of the 66 participants, children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school were significantly less able than secular children to identify supernatural elements, such as talking animals, as fictional.
By relating seemingly impossible religious events achieved through divine intervention (e.g., Jesus transforming water into wine) to fictional narratives, religious children would more heavily rely on religion to justify their false categorizations.
“In both studies, [children exposed to religion] were less likely to judge the characters in the fantastical stories as pretend, and in line with this equivocation, they made more appeals to reality and fewer appeals to impossibility than did secular children,” the study concluded.
Refuting previous hypotheses claiming that children are “born believers,” the authors suggest that “religious teaching, especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible, that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations.”
According to 2013-2014 Gallup data, roughly 83 percent of Americans report a religious affiliation, and an even larger group — 86 percent — believe in God.
More than a quarter of Americans, 28 percent, also believe the Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, while another 47 percent say the Bible is the inspired word of God.

academicatheism:

Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction, Study Finds

Young children who are exposed to religion have a hard time differentiating between fact and fiction, according to a new study published in the July issue of Cognitive Science.

Researchers presented 5- and 6-year-old children from both public and parochial schools with three different types of stories — religious, fantastical and realistic –- in an effort to gauge how well they could identify narratives with impossible elements as fictional.

The study found that, of the 66 participants, children who went to church or were enrolled in a parochial school were significantly less able than secular children to identify supernatural elements, such as talking animals, as fictional.

By relating seemingly impossible religious events achieved through divine intervention (e.g., Jesus transforming water into wine) to fictional narratives, religious children would more heavily rely on religion to justify their false categorizations.

“In both studies, [children exposed to religion] were less likely to judge the characters in the fantastical stories as pretend, and in line with this equivocation, they made more appeals to reality and fewer appeals to impossibility than did secular children,” the study concluded.

Refuting previous hypotheses claiming that children are “born believers,” the authors suggest that “religious teaching, especially exposure to miracle stories, leads children to a more generic receptivity toward the impossible, that is, a more wide-ranging acceptance that the impossible can happen in defiance of ordinary causal relations.”

According to 2013-2014 Gallup data, roughly 83 percent of Americans report a religious affiliation, and an even larger group — 86 percent — believe in God.

More than a quarter of Americans, 28 percent, also believe the Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, while another 47 percent say the Bible is the inspired word of God.

huffingtonpost:

HERE’S JUST HOW MUCH IT PAYS TO BE CONVENTIONALLY ATTRACTIVE

We’ve come to expect impossible, even improbable standards of beauty to populate our magazines and our television shows. It’s another thing entirely to find they’ve invaded our workplace.

Watch Vox’s full video to see the many other ways these unrealistic beauty standards effect where we work.

moirallegianceismagic:

ive been waiting my whole life for this gifset

arrestedfellowship:

footage not found ]

commedes-lavie:

findingnikko:

ikantenggelem:

Assassin’s Creed Unity Meets Parkour in Real Life -video-

omg

SHIT THAT VIDEO IS CRAYZ